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We are a collective of women photographers and storytellers that develop projects about human rights, indentity and territory. We narrate through photography boosted by other artistic disciplines. We are a symbiosis of women’s voices brought together to diversify the way we tell stories in our own region through a solutions based narration promoting change

A ti vuelvo

The fear of losing them made me return: my land, my mother.
we are a land that feels, land that cries, land
that thinks, that suffers and regenerates

In a world where we are bombarded with predatory consumption and overrated individualism, the pandemic shows us how simple life can be when we return to our essence. "A ti Vuelvo" explores the female sense for the protection of the earth as a way to preserve mental, physical and emotional health. The transcendence of the knowledge that the generations behind have communicated to us, and that we will take to future generations. More than 50 years ago, my family had to move from the small town on the slopes of the Cotopaxi volcano to Quito, the capital of Ecuador. My great-grandmother, my grandmother, my aunts, and my mother arrived in the city, separated from Cusubamba. Their knowledge of planting, healthy eating, animal care, and community life survive as distant memories amid chaotic capital life. Since the quarantine began, we started a return trip as a symbolic way that allows us to deal with the experiences of this time.

Portrait of my grandmother María Luisa Jaque holding the carrot seeds that we will sow in the garden. July 7, 2020. Quito-Ecuador.
Johis Alarcón

The flowers of beans grow up in my garden. During the health emergency in Ecuador, a large percentage of the young population returned to work in the land and orchards as a sustainable and self-care economy solution. July 7, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcòn

Self-portrait in the beans of my garden. Since the pandemic has started,  I felt the instinct to go back to earth, to the mother
During the health emergency in Ecuador, a large percentage of the young population returned to work on land and in the farms as a solution for sustainable economy and self-care. July 7, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Self-portrait sharing time with my grandmother María Luisa Jaque. During the quarantine, I can't see her. I miss her because she taught me all the protection of the earth. The unique way to be connected with her was trough my relationship with nature around me. July 18, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón
According to the UN (United Nations Organization), in times of pandemic, it is essential to promote the relationship between women and the environment,  their sensitivity for the care of natural resource management is transmitted from generation to generation.

The altar of my mom stays at home for protection and abundance in the family. The women's rites have passed down through the generations as a spiritual connection.  July 11, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Self-portrait with my mom Mónica Alvarez, in my teenage room.
Every day the fear of contagious grew up, she is a doctor, and I enjoy hugging her when she back home. When she is not there, her plants are our medicine. July 18, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Portrait of my aunt Martha Jaque with the flowers in the garden. July 18, 2020. Quito-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón
According to the UN (United Nations Organization), in times of pandemic, it is essential to promote the relationship between women and the environment,  their sensitivity for the care of natural resource management is transmitted from generation to generation.

Cardomo flowers growing up in the high mountains of Cotopaxi. My grand-grandmother use it for her work on the farm. July 31, 2020. Cotopaxi-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

María Luisa Jaque, my grandmother, sunbathes on the terrace. Almost 16% of the cases of COVID-19 in Ecuador are elderly, the high risk of contagion for being diabetic has kept my grandmother in confinement since March. July 17, 2020. Quito-Ecuador.
Johis Alarcón

The women of my family Martha Jaque, Pamela Gonzáles, Mónica Alvarez, and I weave our hair in the patio of my great-grandmother's house. July 7, 2020. Cusubamba-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Portrait of my cousin Pamela Gonzáles in the during our return to our great-grandmother's house. In the face of the pandemic, the WHO (World Health Organization) recommends that young people return to the field, due to the health benefits and the lower risk of contagion. July 12, 2020. Cusubamba-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Paper trees in the high mountains of Cusubamba, where my great-grandmother's house was. In the face of the pandemic, the WHO (World Health Organization) recommends that young people return to the field, due to the health benefits and the lower risk of contagion. July 31, 2020. Cusubamba-Ecuador. Johis Alarcón

Portrait of my grandmother María Luisa Jaque during the return to her mother's house in Cusubamba.  The WHO (World Health Organization) promotes the return to the field as an alternative that reduces the risk of contagious. July 12, 2020. Johis Alarcón